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  1. 288 Swallow cores booted in just 4.4 seconds!

    27 Mar 2013

    We have a new ethernet booting system! In our most recent experiment, we were able to boot 288 cores of the Swallow system via tftp in just 4.4 seconds. Previously, this would have been impossible due to a JTAG programming limit with the older tools of 127 cores.

    You can watch a video of the blisteringly-fast load! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUo11tTeYK0

  2. 3-year Research Assistant / Associate / Fellow in Microelectronics / VLSI Design

    15 Dec 2012

    Fixed-term contract (42 / 38 / 33 months depending on level) with the option to extend up to 6 months

    Salary: £30,424 – £44,607

    Two researchers are sought on a substantial inter-disciplinary research grant to investigate novel high-frequency power converters, based on the 3D integration of high-speed control ASICs and emerging wide-bandgap power semiconductor devices. This technology is poised to revolutionise power conversion by significantly reducing loss and size. An important challenge is to accurately control ultra-short (ns) switching transients. Industrial partners include a system design corporation and a global semiconductor manufacturer who have a GaN power device manufacturing subsidiary.

    The project includes a microelectronics and a power electronics research strand, and we have a vacancy in each, both with nominal three year periods. The power electronics vacancy is advertised elsewhere.

    The microelectronics researcher will develop custom ASIC designs, including the design and tape-out of a novel high-speed switching control device that can control analogue outputs at sub-ns resolution. The design will be mixed signal in a SiGe process, and will need to meet a key technical challenge of accurately controlling ultra-short switching transients in connected power devices. Design emphasis will be given to high-speed analogue components with a small amount of support logic. The researcher will also assist with the 3D integration of the ASIC into a GaN-based switched-mode power supply.

    We expect applicants to hold, or be about to hold, a PhD in Electronic Engineering, Computer Systems Engineering, Microelectronic Design, Computer Science or a closely related field and fresh PhD graduates are strongly encouraged to apply. Alternatively, you have a first degree in one of these subjects and substantial experience in a research position in industry.

    You must have excellent VLSI design skills in analogue or digital, and be comfortable working with commercial VLSI design packages, such as Cadence Virtuoso/Encounter or similar. During the project, exposure will also occur to the following areas: analogue and digital VLSI design, analogue circuit modelling, microelectronic device packaging, FPGAs, PCB design and impedance-aware design; however it is not expected that you will be an expert in all of these areas and on-project training is available.

    The successful candidates will be expected to take leadership roles in research strands and have responsibility for interactions key academic and industrial collaborators. This will include publishing in peer reviewed journal papers and presenting at conferences

    The Electrical Energy Management Group at the University of Bristol is a leader in applied research into power conversion for vehicle drives and renewable energy. The Microelectronic Design Group is a leader in low power design for ultra-efficient systems.

    If successful, you may be appointed either on a fixed-term or an open-ended contract depending on the extent of your previous relevant research experience. Three years’ appropriate and relevant experience at another higher education institution would normally lead to an appointment on an open-ended contract. Further particulars can be found here and more information on our recruitment procedure can be found at www.bristol.ac.uk/hr/ftc.

    Online applications are accepted at: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/jobs/find/details.html?nPostingID=580&nPostingTargetID=1487

    For informal enquires please contact Bernard Stark, +44 117 9545499, bernard.stark at bristol.ac.uk

    Closing Date: 22 January 2013

    Candidates will be evaluated as applications come in. The preferred start date is 01 March 2013, however there is some flexibility.

    Interview Date(s): Interviews will be held with selected candidates as soon as possible.

    The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

  3. 3-year Research Assistant / Associate / Fellow in Power Electronics

    14 Dec 2012

    University of Bristol – Faculty of Engineering

    Fixed-term contract (42 / 38 / 33 months depending on level) with the option to extend up to 6 months

    Salary: £30,424 – £44,607

    Two researchers are sought on a substantial inter-disciplinary research grant to investigate novel high-frequency power converters, based on the 3D integration of high-speed control ASICs and emerging wide-bandgap power semiconductor devices. This technology is poised to revolutionise power conversion by significantly reducing loss and size. An important challenge is to accurately control ultra-short (ns) switching transients. Industrial partners include a system design corporation and a global semiconductor manufacturer who have a GaN power device manufacturing subsidiary.

    The project includes a power electronics and a microelectronics research strand, and we have a vacancy in each, both with nominal three year periods. The microelectronics vacancy is advertised separately.

    The power electronics researcher will develop high-speed gate-drives and power conversion topologies, and a GHz-bandwidth measurement system, for which there is a substantial budget, in order to investigate the accurate control of ultra-short switching transients in power devices. This will include investigating active and passive means of reducing EMI, experimentally and by using simulation tools, and also supporting the microelectronics researcher in the conception of custom high-speed control and measurement ASICs, and System-in-Package designs.

    We expect applicants to hold, or be about to hold, a PhD in Electronic Engineering or a closely related field, and fresh PhD graduates are strongly encouraged to apply. Alternatively, you have a first degree in one of these subjects and substantial experience in a research position in industry. The successful power electronics candidate should have experience in power converter design and testing.

    During the project, exposure will also occur to the following areas: High-speed gate-driving, EMI, RF circuit design, high-bandwidth measurement, device packaging and micro-PCB design, FPGAs, SPICE and mixed circuit-device simulation, power supply design; however it is not expected that you will be an expert in all of these areas and on-project training is available.

    The successful candidates will be expected to take leadership roles in research strands and have responsibility for interactions key academic and industrial collaborators. This will include publishing in peer reviewed journal papers and presenting at conferences.

    The Power Electronics researcher will be hosted by the Electrical Energy Management Group, who are a leader in applied research into power conversion for vehicle drives and renewable energy. The Microelectronics researcher will be hosted by the Microelectronic Design Group, a leader in low power design for ultra-efficient systems.

    If successful, you may be appointed either on a fixed-term or an open-ended contract depending on the extent of your previous relevant research experience. Three years’ appropriate and relevant experience at another higher education institution would normally lead to an appointment on an open-ended contract. Further particulars can be found here and more information on our recruitment procedure can be found at www.bristol.ac.uk/hr/ftc.

    Applications are accepted online at: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/jobs/find/details.html?nPostingID=579&nPostingTargetID=1515

    For informal enquires please contact Bernard Stark, +44 117 9545499, bernard.stark at bristol.ac.uk

    Closing Date: 22 January 2013

    Candidates will be evaluated as applications come in. The preferred start date is 01 March 2013, however there is some flexibility.

    Interview Date(s): Interviews will be held with selected candidates as soon as possible.

    The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

  4. PDRA position in Energy-Aware System Design

    23 Nov 2012

    The Computer Science Department at the University of Bristol invites applications for a Post Doctoral Research Assistant position in a leading-edge research project entitled “Whole Systems ENergy TRAnsparency (ENTRA)”, funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme Future and Emerging Technologies Objective “Minimizing Energy Consumption of Computing to the Limit”. Application deadline is December 10th.

    Full details are available through the Bristol University website.

  5. Research Assistant/Associate positions in Energy-Aware System Design

    2 Oct 2012

    The Whole Systems ENergy TRAnsparency (ENTRA) project is currently recruiting for two Research Assistant or Research Associate in Energy-Aware System Design posts. Application deadline is October 12th.

    Full details are available through the Bristol University website.

  6. Student wins prestigious 'Experiencing HPC for Undergraduates' scholarship to SC12

    29 Sep 2012

    Nic Ellington, a third year Computer Science and Electronics student, has won a prestigious 'Experiencing HPC for Undergraduates' scholarship to IEEE/ACM SuperComputing 2012.

    Full story here.

  7. Micro group staff present three sessions at the 2012 Multicore Challenge Workshop

    26 Sep 2012

    Three Micro group staff have presented at this year's Multicore Challenge workshop (24th September 2012). Over 230 participants saw a keynote by David May, with workshop presentations on parallel architecture design and testing by Simon McIntosh-Smith and Kerstin Eder.

    Other workshop speakers included representatives from Intel, Nvidia, Imagination Technologies, Xmos, Allinea, Lauterbach, RWTH Aachen University, Universidade Nova de Lisboa and Heriot-Watt University.

    The presentations are available at the TVS website.

  8. NEMIAC project in EE Times

    4 Sep 2012

    The consortium involved in the NEMIAC (nano electro-mechanical relays in a chip) project, including the University of Bristol Micro Group, gets a mention in September's EE Times digital edition!

  9. Bristol joins Khronos Group as use of OpenCL continues to grow

    15 Aug 2012

    The Microelectronics Research Group is now an Academic Member of the Khronos Group, the body responsible for standard APIs such as OpenCL and OpenGL.

    The group has a wide range of projects that utilise the standards put forward by Khronos and is often working at the bleeding edge of the software and its underlying hardware. As a group we work closely with industry on using OpenCL to improve performance of compute-intensive applications. The membership also opens the door for other groups in the University to benefit.

  10. 16-core research board array keeps growing

    16 Jul 2012

    The Microelectronic Research Group's many-core board array project is making excellent progress, with multiple boards assembled into an array of over 100 low power processors.

    The system provides up to 8 threads per core and in its current form could deliver a peak throughput of 56GIPS. The array of XMOS XS1 cores is backed by a low latency XLink network that uses a simple yet effective routing strategy for efficiently passing messages between nodes.

    Eight board stack

    The boards can be stacked to form dense arrays of processing power.

    Eight board stack cabling

    Inexpensive ribbon cabling interconnects the boards, providing both the debug interface and the XLink network across the stack.

    Eight board stack front

    The boards can be connected along all edges to form a 3D mesh (and potentially a torus). In a vertical stack, the bottom connectors of a board are connected to the top of the board sitting beneath it. By stacking the boards we save on precious desk space.

    We have a test version of build software for these boards and will soon be compiling code for them beyond the test cases we have now. We will also be attaching additional devices to provide extra RAM and permanent storage for the array.

    Update: Here's a video of the boards running some test code. The code builds for 112 core in less than a minute.

  11. UK's most powerful GPU cluster, Emerald, powered up

    4 Jul 2012

    The UK's most powerful GPU supercomputer has been brought online at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Oxfordshire. Bristol's Micro Research Group has been working in partnership with RAL, University of Oxford, University College London and University of Southampton, on the project.

    Emerald contains 372 Tesla GPUs and can deliver 114.4TFLOPS. It will be used for a variety of purposes by industry and research groups. See some press coverage and the EPSRC's press release for more information.

  12. New research assistant position with the Micro Group

    26 Jun 2012

    Based in the Department of Computer Science, in collaboration with the Advanced Computing Research Centre, you will work as part of a world-class high performance computing (HPC) group led by Simon McIntosh-Smith. The project is to port HPC software applications from traditional large clusters to new systems exploiting graphics processing units (GPUs). Find out more.

  13. Find out about events and seminars: Subscribe to our mailing list

    18 Jun 2012

    We have created a mailing list that we'll use to notify people of upcoming events and talks in the Micro Research Group. So if you want to find out about and coming along to something in the future, you'd better subscribe.

  14. First 16-core research boards arrive

    16 Apr 2012

    We're in the process of bringing up our first batch of 16-core (128-thread) XMOS XCore-based boards. Each board contains eight dual-core chips assembled into a network; many boards can be connected together to form large processor arrays.

    We've got a bunch of exciting things in store for these boards, but for now, we'll leave you with this picture (click for big).

    Microelectronics Research Group 16-core research board
    Microelectronics Research Group 16-core research board

  15. EACO W4 details updated

    27 Mar 2012

    More details for the upcoming 4th EACO workshop have been made available.

    This includes details of the project areas that we will focus upon and the agenda for the workshop, which is being held on 18th April 2012. Abstracts for project presentations and details of those involved in these projects are also in the process of being put online. Visit the EACO W4 page for more.

  16. Simon Krige joins group under KTP, working on heterogeneous parallel algorithms

    12 Mar 2012

    Simon Krige is joining the Micro group as a TSB-funded Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) under Simon McIntosh-Smith. This KTP is in partnership with Cresset Biomolecular Ltd and will leverage McIntosh-Smith's work in developing parallel algorithms on many-core heterogeneous architectures, such as GPUs, to create new parallel algorithms for Cresset's FieldScreen molecular similarity software products. This appointment is for 18 months.

  17. Bristol and partners win £3.5M regional centre of excellence for HPC

    9 Mar 2012

    A consortium of four leading universities (Bristol, Oxford, Southampton and UCL) has won funding of £3.5M for a new regional centre of excellence in High Performance Computing (HPC). This new virtual centre will provide Europe's second largest GPU computing cluster (an HP SL390 cluster containing 372 NVIDIA M2090 GPUs) and a 4,000 core x86 CPU cluster (growing to 12,000 cores in 12 months). The resources at the new regional centre will be available to HPC researchers at all four institutions and to their industrial partners from June 2012. For more details contact Simon McIntosh-Smith.

  18. Post-Doctoral Research Opportunity in Fault-Tolerant Circuits and Systems Design

    5 Mar 2012

    Based in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bristol, there is currently an opportunity for post-doctoral research for three years starting from July 2012. You will carry out research in fault-tolerant VLSI Design, under the supervision of Prof. Dhiraj Pradhan in collaboration with other researchers.

    Salary: £30122 - £33884 per annum.

    About the position

    The research will target fault-tolerant design techniques for promising future technologies. The development of these novel fault-tolerant techniques is crucial to keep pace with the scaling and innovation processes. In particular, the proposed research will address the challenges in fault tolerant design of emerging memory and logic technologies, such as memristors. This project is supported by engineering and physical sciences research council (EPSRC, UK) in collaboration with University of Rome (Italy), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA). The industrial partners are HP Labs (USA), Intel (USA) and STMicro (Italy).

    The job responsibilities include, but not limited to, conducting independent research as well as guiding postgraduate students working in the group. The applicant will have a PhD, research experience and publications in fault-tolerant VLSI design or in related areas. Furthermore, the applicant will need to demonstrate good written and oral communication skills with the ability to present papers at conferences and work with others in a collaborative context.

    Informal enquiries to Professor Pradhan (pradhan [at] cs.bris.ac.uk) for further details regarding the position are encouraged before submitting your application.

    About University of Bristol

    The University of Bristol is an international powerhouse of learning, discovery and enterprise. Its vision is of a university whose excellence is acknowledged locally, nationally and globally. The Sunday Times (September 2008) described the University of Bristol as ‘one of the jewels of British higher education’ and ‘at the cutting edge academically’.

    The University is a member of the Worldwide Universities Network, a grouping of 18 research-led institutions of international standing, and of the Russell Group of universities, an association of 20 major research-intensive universities of the UK.

    The University of Bristol is dedicated to academic achievement across a broad range of disciplines. It is made up of 24 schools, organised in six faculties: Arts; Engineering; Medical and Veterinary Sciences; Medicine and Dentistry; Science; and Social Sciences and Law. It has approximately 12,000 undergraduate and 5,000 postgraduate students from around 100 countries. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, which carried out an institutional audit of the University in 2008, awarded Bristol the highest rating available for its management of education and the academic standards of its awards. It has 31 Fellows of the Royal Society and nine of the British Academy – a remarkable achievement for a relatively compact university.

    Department of Computer Science at Bristol

    The Department of Computer Science at Bristol is one of the top centres of research and teaching in computer science in the UK. It is a Grade 5A Research Department undertaking state-of-the-art research in computer science and it offers challenging up-to-date teaching programmes at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. There are currently over 200 undergraduate and over 100 postgraduate students studying within the Department.

    The department is an international centre of excellence in the foundations and applications of computing. Staff in the department carry out internationally leading research in Intelligent Systems, Digital Media, Foundations, Personal Systems, and Architecture and Design.

  19. Award to build 512 processor system for Dr Simon Hollis

    1 Mar 2012

    Dr Simon Hollis has been awarded £3,200 under the EPSRC Institutional Sponsorship scheme. The money will be used to fund an expansion of Dr Hollis' novel highly-parallel processing system, built around the XMOS processor. Currently, the system is scaled up to 160 processors, and the award will allow it to be increased in size up to 512 processors, as well as enabling open-access for the UK community.

    More information can be found about the many-core research effort on its website.

  20. Micro Group presenting at SIAM PP 12

    14 Feb 2012

    Steve Kerrison of the Microelectronics Research Group will giving a presentation as part of the "Do you have the Energy?" mini-symposium at this year's SIAM Parallel Computing for Scientific Computing conference.

    The event is being held at the Hyatt Regency in Savannah, Georgia, USA from the 15th to the 17th February. The presentation, titled "Energy Efficient HPC Software: Learning from Embedded Systems Development", looks at the research conducted by the group into energy efficient embedded software systems and how some of these developments can be used by and guide energy efficient HPC software development.

    The presentation was written by Steve Kerrison, Simon McIntosh-Smith and Kerstin Eder. The mini-symposium has been organised by Prof. Anne Trefethen from the University of Oxford's e-Research Centre.

  21. Second annual Bristol EACO workshop: Sept/Oct 2012

    10 Feb 2012

    The provisional scheduling of the main annual Bristol EACO workshop will now be in September/October 2012. Specific dates will be provided as soon as possible. For more information on the EACO series of workshops, including the main annual workshop, see the Micro Group's EACO pages.

  22. Seminar: Imagination Technologies - "Unconventional Design for ASIC"

    2 Feb 2012

    Dr Enzo D'Alessandro from Imagination Technologies will give an industrial seminar on "Unconventional Logic Design". The talk will be accessible for all, and will be held in room 1.06 in the Merchant Venturers Building, University of Bristol.

    Abstract: I will talk on unconventional logic design (asynchronous, sub-threshold and adiabatic logic) with a strong perspective on practical applications and industry’s reluctance to change current methodologies; the idea came from a series of discussions with academics which ended up on the limitations intrinsic in the current abstraction models we use, which in a way forces us to do design the way we do it: the underlying question is – do we need a completely new approach to logic design? What would be the impact on industry’s flows if such a shift were to take place?

  23. Simon McIntosh-Smith gives the MULTIPROG keynote address at HiPEAC 2012

    27 Jan 2012

    Simon McIntosh-Smith, head of the Microelectronics Research group at the University of Bristol, gave the opening keynote at MULTIPROG, part of the FP7-funded HiPEAC 2012 conference in Paris. Over 100 delegates attended to the talk, titled 'Mechanisms for exploiting heterogeneous computing: Harnessing hundreds of GPUs and CPUs'.

    The talk is available for download.

  24. PhD studentship opportunity, NEMIAC project

    27 Jan 2012

    The Micro group has an opening for two Fully funded PhD Studentships in the Nano-Electro-Mechanical Integration and Computation (NEMIAC) project. This is a European Commission funded project that aims to produce the world's first nano-electro-mechanical relay based ultra-low-power processor. The NEMIAC project is being undertaken in collaboration with industry and other academic institutions in Europe.

    Nano-electro-mechanical (NEM) relays have the advantage of essentially zero "off" current, and therefore has been the subject of much research to understand their potential in building logic circuits with the promise of order of magnitude improvements in energy efficiency, but many issues such as reliability, speed and miniaturisation remain unresolved. This project aims to build the world's first nano-electro-mechanical processor, and can be viewed as a rebirth of electro-mechanical computing, since the Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator (Harvard Mark I) built by IBM in 1946 heralded the dawn of the modern computing era. A successful project has the potential to yield many firsts, in technology, design and demonstration.

    For more details, including entry requirements, see the jobs.ac.uk listing for these studentships.

  25. Birds of a Feather on Energy Efficient HPC at SC'11

    15 Nov 2011

    Simon McIntosh-Smith is running an Energy Efficient HPC BoF in collaboration with ARM at IEEE/ACM SuperComputing 2011 (SC'11) in Seattle this year. The BoF features senior figures from academia and industry and will include the launch of a new community website to aid the evolution of this fast-emerging space.

    For more details see the SC'11 schedule.

  26. Join the Micro Group on Google+

    10 Nov 2011

    We've created a Google+ page for the Microelectronics Research Group. Join us there to see and share interesting microelectronics news and innovations from around the world, and get involved in the latest discussions.

  27. Industrial Mathematics KTN releases "The GPU Computing Revolution" report

    28 Sep 2011

    The Industrial Mathematics KTN has released a new report on The GPU Computing Revolution: from Multi-Core CPUs to Many-Core Graphics Processors. Written for a nonspecialist audience, it explains the background to technology developments that are changing the face of computing, and shows what business and government can do to exploit the resulting opportunities. The GPU Computing Revolution has been produced in collaboration with the London Mathematical Society and written by Simon McIntosh-Smith of the Microelectronics Research Group.

    More details are available on the KTN website or you can download the full report (1.3MB).

  28. Micro group welcomes visiting fellows

    27 Sep 2011

    The Micro Research Group would like to welcome a number of visiting fellows from the microelectronics industry to its ranks.

    Geoff Barrett is Associate Technical Director for Broadcom's Broadband Communications Group; Dr. Mike Bartley is CEO of testing and verification experts TVS; Harry Foster is Chief Scientist of Verification at Mentor Graphics and Dr. Shmuel Ur is an IP consultant and former IBM Master Inventor.

    The Micro Group has a history of working closely with industry and with our new visiting fellows we look forward to continuing to do so. See a full list of the group's members on our people page.

  29. Energy-Aware COmputing (EACO) workshop 3 to take place on 19th October 2011

    22 Sep 2011

    The third Energy-Aware COmputing (EACO) workshop will take place at the University of Bristol on October 19th. The special focus of this workshop is on Alternative Models for Energy-Aware COmputation with one session focused solely on Learning from Biology.

    The purpose of the EACO series is to bring together researchers and engineers with interests in energy-aware computing for discussions to identify intellectual challenges that can be developed into collaborative research projects. We strive to go significantly beyond the state of the art.

    Download the full agenda (PDF).

    To attend this workshop please register a place using the event booking system.

    More information about the Bristol EACO Initiative is available on the EACO page.

  30. Micro Group attends TSB Energy Efficient Computing Workshop

    7 Sep 2011

    Dr Kerstin Eder from the Bristol Micro Research Group is presenting today at the Technology Strategy Board workshop on "Energy Efficient Computing: Growing the industry in the UK".

    The aim of the workshop is to "identify barriers to identify the barriers to commercial exploitation of Energy Efficient Computing and develop investments to overcome them". Dr Eder will be aiding the discussion by highlighting the opportunities that exist and some of the challenges that we are trying to address in our research.

  31. Research assistant vacancy: massively parallel software libraries for high performance computing

    26 Aug 2011

    We are looking for another research assistant to work within the group. Details of the position follow.

    A Postdoctoral Research Assistant is required by the Department of Computer Science in collaboration with the School of Chemistry to work at the forefront of new science in high performance computing (HPC), biomolecular simulation, and computational chemistry.

    You will work as part of a team of world leaders in computational chemistry (Professor Adrian Mulholland and Dr Christopher Woods) and HPC (Simon McIntosh-Smith).

    The project is to design and implement a software library for HPC software developers to parallelise scientific and engineering workloads, with an initial focus on biomolecular simulations. The library will provide a workpacket/workqueue system, whereby chunks of computational work (workpackets) can be scheduled in a fault-tolerant fashion across a distributed hierarchy of workqueues. These workpackets will then be processed using a diverse range of HPC hardware, ranging from GPUs to clusters. The working system will be demonstrated by applying it to a number of grand challenges in computational chemistry, employing large scale HPC resources to scientifically important biomolecular simulation problems.

    The post is funded as part of the EPSRC HPC software-development program, under a two stage grant. The post is for 24 months in the first stage. If this stage is successful, a second stage may be funded for an additional 24 to 36 months in order to further develop the software and deploy it across a wider range of applications in collaboration with domain scientists. For more information please see the project website.

    If successful, you may be appointed either on a fixed-term or a permanent contract depending on the extent of your previous relevant research experience. Further information can be found at www.bristol.ac.uk/personnel/ftc/

    Closing Date : 9:00am 20 Sep 2011

    For complete details and to apply, visit the Working at Bristol website.

  32. Research assistant vacancy: Adaptive, reliable heterogeneous MPSoCs

    24 Aug 2011

    We are looking for a research assistant to work within the group. Details of the position follow.

    Based in the Department of Computer Science you will carry out research in the area of adaptive, reliable heterogeneous MPSoCs (Multiprocessor Systems-on-Chip) under the direction of the academic/industrial leaders on the project.

    You will develop research projects in this area in close collaboration with EU partners on the project, in all stages of the research from conception to dissemination. You will undertake independent research in Fault tolerant design and Testing, ideally related to Multiprocessor Systems-on-Chip and contribute to the management of and where appropriate lead on research projects in the above areas.

    In addition you will provide hands-on research training and support to the PhD students on the project and play a leading role in the building activities in the project including web presence, coordinating seminars, workshops, reading groups and working with other EU partners.

    You will have a good first degree in Computer/Electrical Engineering or exceptional postgraduate qualification in Computer System Design, together with a PhD in Computer Science/ Electrical Engineering a related topic.

    You will also have strong computer programming skills for research on Multiprocessor Systems-on-Chip ( C++, SystemVerilog, VHDL/Verilog, Matlab etc) and experience in ASIC/FPGA design experience with State of the Art System on Chip Design flow.

    Closing Date : 15 September 2011

    For complete details and to apply, visit the Working at Bristol website.

  33. OpenCL workshop at SC11 to be co-run by Simon McIntosh-Smith

    22 Aug 2011

    Simon McIntosh-Smith will be co-running an all-day workshop at the IEEE/ACM Conference on High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis (SuperComputing) with Tim Mattson from Intel and Ben Gaster from AMD.

    Abstract: OpenCL is an open standard for programming heterogeneous computers composed of CPUs, GPUs and other processors. OpenCL consists of a framework to define the platform as a host (typically a CPU) and one or more compute devices (e.g. a GPU) plus a C-based programming language for writing programs for the compute devices. Using OpenCL, a programmer can write parallel programs that use all the resources of the heterogeneous computer. In this hands-on tutorial, we will introduce OpenCL. The format will be a 50/50 split between lectures and exercises. Students will use their own laptops (Windows, Linux or OS/X) ideally with OpenCL already loaded (see www.heterogeneouscompute.org for information about available OpenCL compilers). We will also provide online systems that can run OpenCL. Students should load putty or some other terminal client prior to the tutorial in order to use these online systems.

    More details are available on the SC11 website.

  34. David May dubbed 'unsung hero of tech'

    18 Aug 2011

    The Register's Chris Bidmead reflects on the career thus far of Micro group's Professor David May in a salute to the architect of the transputer and the driving force of a paradigm shift in how we think about processor architectures and how to program for them. The article looks at David's time at Warwick University in the 1970s, moves through the Inmos era of the 1980s and the development of the Occam parallel programming language, and of course the pioneering work that continues to take place in the South-west today.

    Prof. May is presenting a paper on the XMOS XS1 parallel processor architecture at Hot Chips 23 this week.

  35. Prof. May presents XMOS multi-core architecture at Hot Chips conference

    17 Aug 2011

    Prof David May is to present at the Hot Chips 23 conference at Stanford University on August 18th. He will be describing the XS1 multi-core architecture, originally developed within the University of Bristol's Microelectronics group, before starting XMOS to commercialise the technology.

  36. The Economist covers West Country's tech success

    9 Aug 2011

    An article in this week's Economist reflects upon the successes in the West of England and Wales that have established the area as a leading location for high tech industry in Britain and Europe.

    The article looks at the government stimulus in the 70s that lead to Inmos and other companys that have emerged since such as Picochip and XMOS. The University of Bristol and members of the Microelectronics Research Group have been involved in several of these ventures. From the article:

    David May left a teaching post at Warwick University for a job at Inmos in 1978. He helped design the “transputer” technology used in countless set-top boxes. [...] Mr May is now a professor of computer science at Bristol University and chief technology officer at Xmos.

    Read the article in the current print edition or online at The Economist website.

  37. Dr John Colley visits Micro Research Group

    21 Jul 2011

    Dr John Colley from the University of Southampton's department of Electronics and Computer Science visited the Microelecronics Research Group on Thursday to present details of his work in the area of verifying elastic pipelines and software-driven I/O.

    The group shared its current research in the area of I/O verification as well as the implications of reliable I/O timing information on energy aware computing. Dr Colley shared his research in this area.

    The group is looking forward to exploring the collaboration opportunities that have arisen from Dr Colley's visit. More details of Dr Colley's talks, including copies of the slides, can be found on the events page.

  38. Second annual Bristol EACO workshop set for July 2012

    20 Jul 2011

    The University of Bristol Microelectronics Research Group has provisionally set Wednesday 11th and Thursday 12th July 2012 as the dates for the Second Annual Bristol Energy Aware COmputing Workshop.

    A number of projects and collaboration opportunities were created at the 2011 workshop. The 2012 EACO workshop will allow participants to share the progress made in these projects. In addition we will re-examine the state of the art and identify new opportunities for researchers and industry to explore in collaboration. Of course there will be more Wild And Crazy Ideas (WACI) put forward for consideration and another lively debate. Year-on-year, EACO will make significant contributions to the cutting-edge of energy aware computing across the entire system stack from software via hardware down to silicon.

    We are looking to widen the participation in the EACO 2012 workshop even further, but want to keep it free to attend. If you are interested in supporting EACO 2012, please contact Kerstin Eder to discuss sponsorship opportunities. Thank you.

  39. EACO workshop takes place 13th/14th July

    7 Jul 2011

    Get more details on our EACO workshop page and visit the event booking system if you want an invite.

  40. Microelectronics group launches new website

    5 Jul 2011

    The μ research group has a new website that we will use to keep interested parties informed about our latest developments and group activities.

    Students looking for projects can find out more whilst industry can see who we are collaborating with on cutting-edge research, paving the way for new microelectronic systems technologies.

    Some parts of the site still require some additional content adding to them and this will be seen to in the next few days.