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Theoretical Computer Science at the Newton Institute

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26 July 2010



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Bristol cryptographer takes a lead role in creating a six month theme at the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge to celebrate the legacy of Alan Turing in 2012. 

The year 2012 is the 100th annniversary of the birth of Alan Turing, and to celebrate this there will be a six month programme at the Isaac Newton Institute
in Cambridge.

The programme, entitled Semantics and Syntax: A Legacy of Alan Turing, will bring together leading researchers from areas of Computer Science and Mathematics associated with Alan Turing's legacy. In particular it will focus on bridging the gap between areas of Computer Science associated with purely syntactic approaches (where one deals with purely symbolic methods and logic), with those associated with more semantic approaches (where one attaches meaning and costs to the symbols, such as in complexity theory).

This divide is currently an area of great interest in the analysis of cryptographic protocols, as evidenced by Bristol's involvement in the EPSRC CryptoForma network.

Bristol co-organizer Prof. Smart said "It is great to be involved in such a prestigious programme at the Newton Institute. And it is particularly fitting that this is also in the centenury year of Alan Turing's birth".

There will be a number of events to celebrate Turing's birth. In particular Prof. Smart is General Chair of Eurocrypt 2012, the worlds largest academic conference on cryptography, which will also be held in Cambridge in April 2012.

Details of other events for the Turing Centenary can be found at http://www.turingcentenary.eu/.

The Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is the national and international visitor research institute in the mathematical sciences. Since opening in 1992, it has run research programmes on selected themes in mathematics and the mathematical sciences with applications over a wide range of science and technology. It attracts leading mathematical scientists from the UK and overseas to interact in research over an extended period.